bookmark_borderWhat is Ocular Migraine and Why Fioricet is Good to Treat Ocular Migraine?

To many people, a migraine headache is a migraine headache. They assume, falsely, that all migraines are pretty much the same.

Headache

So when one of the 15% of our population that suffers from migraine says they have an ocular migraine, non-sufferers may raise a skeptical eyebrow. The truth is, however, that there are many different kinds of migraine.

Define Ocular Migraine

An ocular migraine is a type of migraine that focuses on that part of the aura in which visual symptoms predominate. There may never be an actual headache.

Symptoms of Ocular Migraine

If you are familiar with regular migraine pain, and now hear of ocular migraine, you may very well ask, “How do I know if I have an ocular migraine? I have no headache.”

An ocular migraine is sometimes called a migraine without headache. It is a migraine that distorts images when you look at them. The distortion usually begins in the image’s center, and then moves to one side. Ocular migraine is likely to affect only one eye at a time. As an ocular migraine progresses, images may turn grey or wavy. You may even lose your sight temporarily.

Doctors differ in their understanding of ocular migraine. Some say that ocular migraine is more likely to occur as you get older. Others say it is typically seen in young adults. It can be quite frightening, as you may think you are losing your sight forever.

Physicians differ, too, in their understanding of ocular migraine symptoms. Some use the term to explain visual disturbances of aura without headache. Other use it to refer to one-sided blind spots in the field of vision, or blindness, that lasts less than an hour and is associated with a headache.

Do you have ocular migraine? With or without a headache, if you have the visual disturbances of an aura in only one eye, yours may be an ocular migraine.

Specific Symptoms of Ocular Migraine:

How do I know if I have an ocular migraine? I will have one or more of the following specific symptoms. See if any of these is true of you.

1. Holes in your field of vision – places where there is nothing. Perhaps you are looking at a flower, and the center of the flower is missing. Or you are watching television, and you can see the outside of the screen, but cannot see the center of the picture. When you close the unaffected eye, you can see that portion of the screen. The affected eye, however, has a blind spot.

2. When looking through the affected eye, you see everything as though hidden behind a shade of gray. It is as though you were watching television and someone slipped a piece of thin gray cloth over the screen.

3. Another test for ocular migraine is to see if the affected eye sees things as though looking through a window with rain streaming down over it. The watery glass effect will be limited to one eye.

Ocular Migraine Symptoms Are Temporary

Although you may feel, during an optical migraine episode, that you will never see clearly again, the symptoms are temporary and will not cause lasting damage to your eye.

While they are present, however, ocular migraine symptoms will interfere with daily activities such as reading and driving.

Why Ocular Migraine Is Not Just Another Migraine Aura

Ocular migraine and migraine with aura are very similar, and some people have difficulty distinguishing between the two. The source of the visual disturbances is the key. even though it is migraine with aura, the source of visual trouble is the brain’s occipital cortex. even though it is ocular migraine, the source is the eye’s retinal blood vessels.

Test Your Suspected Ocular Migraine

A relatively good test for ocular migraine is to cover or close one eye. even though the symptoms remain, cover or close the opposite eye. even though the symptoms stop, you probably have an ocular migraine. even though the symptoms do not stop, but affect both eyes, you are probably experiencing traditional migraine aura.

CAUTION: Although yours may be ocular migraine, it may be something else. You are urged to seek advice from your physician. You will want to rule out serious eye disease, or a blood vessel disorder in vessels near the eye.

Buy Mikart Fioricet Online
Buy Mikart Fioricet Online

Why Fioricet is Good to Treat Ocular Migraine ?

Fioricet is a combination medication composed of acetaminophen (Tylenol’s main ingredient), caffeine, and butalbital. It is used to relieve tension headaches and can also be prescribed to treat mild to moderate migraine.

Butalbital belongs to the barbiturate class of medication, which means it is a sedative, or relaxant.1 This makes Fioricet a barbiturate. Because it contains acetaminophen and caffeine, it is also a pain reliever and a stimulant.

Medications containing this combination of ingredients come in capsule and tablet forms, which can be taken by mouth. This combination of medications is also available in generics. Other brand names and formulations include:

  • Esgic®
  • Fioricet® with Codeine (containing Acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine, Codeine)
  • Phrenilin® with Codeine (containing Acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine, Codeine)2

What are the ingredients in Fioricet?

The active ingredients in Fioricet are acetaminophen, caffeine, and butalbital.

How does Fioricet work?

The acetaminophen in Fioricet is a pain reliever, the caffeine works as a stimulant to increase the acetaminophen’s effectiveness, and the butalbital is a sedative that decreases anxiety while causing relaxation and sleepiness. These actions are believed to ease migraine symptoms, but there is limited evidence that barbituates ease migraine symptoms.

What are the possible side effects of Fioricet?

The most common side effects from Fioricet include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Upset stomach
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach pain
  • Depression
  • Lightheadedness
  • Confusion3

The following side effects could be signs of allergy or more serious complications and should be reported to health provider immediately:

  • Skin rash
  • Itching
  • Difficulty breathing2

This is not an exhaustive list of all potential side effects of Fioricet. For more information, consult your doctor or healthcare provider. Patients should talk to their doctor about what to expect with treatment with Fioricet. If you notice any new or worsening side effects, contact your doctor or healthcare provider immediately.

Things to note about Fioricet

Fioricet can be habit-forming, so you should use extreme caution if you decide to take it. Additionally, some people who take barbituates or opioids for extended periods can experience rebound headaches, which can increase in severity. These are also known as MOH, or medication overuse headaches.1

Barbituates can cause drowsiness, and their effect can be increased by alcohol use. It is important not to drive or use heavy machinery until you know how this drug affects you.2

Before taking Fioricet, tell your doctor if you:

  • Are allergic to any ingredients in the medication
  • Are taking blood thinners, antidepressants, antihistamines, or other sedatives like sleeping pills or tranquilizers.
  • Are taking pain medications. Many over-the-counter pain relievers contain acetaminophen, and too much of this drug can be harmful.
  • Have ever had liver disease, porphyria, or depression
  • Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding2

You should begin no medication or supplement without first checking with your health care provider and should let them know of any other prescriptions, OTCs, and herbals you are taking to ensure there are no interactions.

bookmark_borderWhy Does Fioricet Work for Headaches?

Fioricet is a medication that is being used more and more often for patients who are struggling with constant tension All kinds of Headache and migraines.

How it works

  • Fioricet is a combination pain-reliever (analgesic) containing acetaminophen, butalbital, and caffeine.
  • Experts aren’t sure exactly how acetaminophen works, but suspect it blocks a specific type of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme, located mainly in the brain.
  • Butalbital belongs to the class of medicines called barbiturates. When used for pain due to tension headaches experts believe it works by relaxing muscle contractions and causing sedation via an enhancement of the inhibitory effects of GABA (a neurotransmitter that regulates communication between brain cells).
  • Caffeine is thought to enhance the pain-relieving effects of acetaminophen by up to 40%. In addition, it has vasoconstrictive properties, narrowing blood vessels in the brain thereby decreasing blood flow and oxygen tension (before a headache or a migraine, blood vessels tend to enlarge). This also helps to relieve pain.
  • Fioricet belongs to the class of medicines known as barbiturates because it contains butalbital. It may also be called a combination analgesic.
fioricet Mechanism of action
fioricet Mechanism of action

Since these types of All kinds of Headache have similar causes, they can easily be treated with the same type of medication. Before you start using this medication, though, you might be wondering exactly how and why it works on your body. Here’s some information on the main ingredients in Fioricet and what they do for your body.

Acetaminophen is one of the main ingredients in this medication. It is a blood thinner that is often used as an over the counter pain reliever and fever reducer. Chances are likely that if you’ve struggled with All kinds of Headache for a while, you may have already tried taking acetaminophen under different brand names to reduce your pain. Chances are likely that it didn’t work for the worst of your All kinds of Headache.

The reason that it works in Fioricet, though, is that it’s combined with two other ingredients: Butalbital and caffeine.

Butalbital is a barbiturate, a powerful medication used to relax the muscles and ease tension. This medication can make some people sleepy, so you should be careful about using Fioricet when you’re driving or operating heavy machinery.

Many times tension All kinds of Headache and migraines are caused by the tension in neck and shoulder muscles. Since Butalbital helps ease this tension, it can get rid of one of the underlying causes for such All kinds of Headache.

Many people are surprised to learn that caffeine is a major active ingredient in Fioricet. This substance, though, actually can increase blood flow and help the nervous system function more smoothly.

For this reason, it helps the body loosen up and can also ensure that the other two active ingredients are delivered to the proper spots in the body more quickly through the fast-flowing blood stream.

Before you purchase Fioricet from a pharmacy, you might want to check out the different options for ordering this effective headache and tension medication. You can actually get better prices by purchasing it online. Plus, ordering them online is excellent because you can conveniently get your medications delivered right to your door.

The discretion and ease involved in purchasing your pain relieving medication this way is unparalleled by what any regular pharmacy can offer. Before you decide to purchase your Fioricet, make sure you research other purchasing options that might save you time and money.

bookmark_borderMigraine Symptom and Why Fioricet is Good for Migraine ?

Migraine is a common neurological condition that affects millions of people from all ages, nationalities and gender. Like any other disease, its presence is manifested by symptoms felt by the sufferer and whose existence allows physicians to make a diagnosis.

Fioricet for Migraine
Fioricet for Migraine

The most common migraine symptom and the most recognizable as well, is the headache. Although it is not present in the rarer forms of the disease, it is one evident sign of migraine. The headache that accompanies a migraine is not the kind that gives a dull ache. The pain felt by migraines is the intense, throbbing kind which sometimes necessitates complete rest and disrupts normal daily functions. However, a headache is not the only indicator that signals a migraine.

Depending on the migraine attack, a host of other symptoms arise as well. Analyzing them helps the medical practitioner in determining what type of migraine the patient is suffering from and in prescribing the appropriate medications.

An inventory of migraine symptoms could be quite lengthy due to the various types of the disease. A generalized list of these include: severe headache on one or both sides of the head, nausea, vomiting, weakness, vision disturbance, sensitivity to light and sound, pain over one eye, aura, blurred vision and temporary blind spots. When the migraine comes with aura, this gives rise to a whole new set of symptoms that consists of: seeing flashing lights or zigzag lines, temporary blindness, speech difficulty, tingling and weakness in the limbs and face, confusion, giddiness and noise sensitivity.

This does not mean the sufferer undergoes all the symptoms during the attack. Most likely, he will experience only a few. Symptoms also vary from person to person. Further, a migraine symptom could be felt days before the attack, during the prodrome stage. In these times, the migraineur has unexplained feelings of elation or intense energy, cravings for sweets, thirst, drowsiness or irritability and depression.

Diagnosing migraine is not an easy task for the physician. In order to make an accurate evaluation, he will need to have as much information as possible, obtained from the patient and from medical tests conducted. Observation and analysis of symptoms is very helpful in arriving at a diagnosis. By knowing what symptoms are experienced by the patient, the specialist will be able to tell what type of migraine it is and what treatments are to be administered.

During consultation, the patient will be required to describe the duration and frequency of his All kinds of Headache and how intense they are, where pain is located, presence of associated symptoms and behavior during a headache.

Since other illnesses also exhibit similar sings to migraine, these have to be ruled out. A case in point is the fact that people with sever sinusitis also experience double vision and vision loss.

Experiencing migraine, however mild, is not a pleasant event. But the sufferer can put this to good use by being observant and recording what he is going through. The complexity of migraine and the difficulty in diagnosing it means that no detail is insignificant. Thus, if the patient is to take an active role in the management of his disease, he needs to be vigilant of every single migraine symptom.

Migraine Symptoms

Migraines, which often begin in childhood, adolescence or early adulthood, can progress through four stages: prodrome, aura, attack and post-drome. Not everyone who has migraines goes through all stages.

Prodrome

One or two days before a migraine, you might notice subtle changes that warn of an upcoming migraine, including:

  • Constipation
  • Mood changes, from depression to euphoria
  • Food cravings
  • Neck stiffness
  • Increased thirst and urination
  • Frequent yawning

Aura

For some people, aura might occur before or during migraines. Auras are reversible symptoms of the nervous system. They’re usually visual, but can also include other disturbances. Each symptom usually begins gradually, builds up over several minutes and lasts for 20 to 60 minutes.

Examples of migraine aura include:

  • Visual phenomena, such as seeing various shapes, bright spots or flashes of light
  • Vision loss
  • Pins and needles sensations in an arm or leg
  • Weakness or numbness in the face or one side of the body
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Hearing noises or music
  • Uncontrollable jerking or other movements

Attack

A migraine usually lasts from four to 72 hours if untreated. How often migraines occur varies from person to person. Migraines might occur rarely or strike several times a month.

During a migraine, you might have:

  • Pain usually on one side of your head, but often on both sides
  • Pain that throbs or pulses
  • Sensitivity to light, sound, and sometimes smell and touch
  • Nausea and vomiting

Post-drome

After a migraine attack, you might feel drained, confused and washed out for up to a day. Some people report feeling elated. Sudden head movement might bring on the pain again briefly.

When to see a doctor

Migraines are often undiagnosed and untreated. If you regularly have signs and symptoms of migraine, keep a record of your attacks and how you treated them. Then make an appointment with your doctor to discuss your headaches.

Even if you have a history of headaches, see your doctor if the pattern changes or your headaches suddenly feel different.

See your doctor immediately or go to the emergency room if you have any of the following signs and symptoms, which could indicate a more serious medical problem:

  • An abrupt, severe headache like a thunderclap
  • Headache with fever, stiff neck, mental confusion, seizures, double vision, weakness, numbness or trouble speaking
  • Headache after a head injury, especially if the headache worsens
  • A chronic headache that is worse after coughing, exertion, straining or a sudden movement
  • New headache pain after age 50

Migraine Causes

Though migraine causes aren’t fully understood, genetics and environmental factors appear to play a role.

Changes in the brainstem and its interactions with the trigeminal nerve, a major pain pathway, might be involved. So might imbalances in brain chemicals — including serotonin, which helps regulate pain in your nervous system.

Researchers are studying the role of serotonin in migraines. Other neurotransmitters play a role in the pain of migraine, including calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP).

How are migraines diagnosed?

Despite their dramatic symptoms, migraines are almost never due to an underlying problem that will show up on any testing, even on brain MRIs. Many experts do not recommend brain imaging at all, even in severe cases, as long as the patient’s symptoms are typical for migraines and a thorough neurological examination is normal.

There are extremely rare families that have migraines as a result of a single genetic mutation in one of four known genes that can lead to the condition called familial hemiplegic migraine. There are no genetic tests for the vast majority of patients. Because the condition cannot be diagnosed by scan or blood test, the diagnosis is “clinical” — made by an experienced physician.

How are migraines treated?

Migraines that are severe, frequent or accompanied by neurological symptoms are best treated preventively, usually with a combination of dietary modification, lifestyle changes, vitamins and daily prescription medications. Most of our best preventive medications are often used for other medical purposes as well; the majority are blood pressure drugs, antidepressants or epilepsy medications. Individual headache attacks are best treated early, often with one or more of the following types of medications: triptans, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), anti-emetics (anti-nausea), and sometimes narcotics or steroids.

Migraines typically last a few hours to a couple of days and respond well to specific treatments. However, in some patients, the migraine is particularly severe and long-lasting — and may even become chronic, occurring continuously for weeks, months or even years. If improperly managed or left untreated, intermittent migraines may essentially transform into a chronic daily headache, with continuous and smoldering symptoms that periodically erupt into a “full-blown” migraine. This condition is extremely difficult to treat.

Other patients may develop increasingly frequent headaches as a result of overusing their short-acting headache medications. See medication overuse headache. While they are considered primary headaches, meaning they have no known underlying cause, migraines are associated with an increased risk of stroke, brain scarring as seen on MRI scans, a heart defect called a patent foramen ovale (PFO) and other medical conditions.

At the Johns Hopkins Headache Center, located at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical center, we have expert physical therapists, nutritionists and psychologists who work closely with our neurologists to help manage patients with frequent migraines. Biofeedback and relaxation techniques are available to complement our standard medical treatments.

Migraine triggers

There are a number of migraine triggers, including:

  • Hormonal changes in women. Fluctuations in estrogen, such as before or during menstrual periods, pregnancy and menopause, seem to trigger headaches in many women.Hormonal medications, such as oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy, also can worsen migraines. Some women, however, find their migraines occurring less often when taking these medications.
  • Drinks. These include alcohol, especially wine, and too much caffeine, such as coffee.
  • Stress. Stress at work or home can cause migraines.
  • Sensory stimuli. Bright lights and sun glare can induce migraines, as can loud sounds. Strong smells — including perfume, paint thinner, secondhand smoke and others — trigger migraines in some people.
  • Sleep changes. Missing sleep, getting too much sleep or jet lag can trigger migraines in some people.
  • Physical factors. Intense physical exertion, including sexual activity, might provoke migraines.
  • Weather changes. A change of weather or barometric pressure can prompt a migraine.
  • Medications. Oral contraceptives and vasodilators, such as nitroglycerin, can aggravate migraines.
  • Foods. Aged cheeses and salty and processed foods might trigger migraines. So might skipping meals or fasting.
  • Food additives. These include the sweetener aspartame and the preservative monosodium glutamate (MSG), found in many foods.

Why Fioricet is good for migraine relief ?

  • Fioricet is a combination pain-reliever (analgesic) containing acetaminophen, butalbital, and caffeine.
  • Experts aren’t sure exactly how acetaminophen works, but suspect it blocks a specific type of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme, located mainly in the brain.
  • Butalbital belongs to the class of medicines called barbiturates. When used for pain due to tension headaches experts believe it works by relaxing muscle contractions and causing sedation via an enhancement of the inhibitory effects of GABA (a neurotransmitter that regulates communication between brain cells).
  • Caffeine is thought to enhance the pain-relieving effects of acetaminophen by up to 40%. In addition, it has vasoconstrictive properties, narrowing blood vessels in the brain thereby decreasing blood flow and oxygen tension (before a headache or a migraine, blood vessels tend to enlarge). This also helps to relieve pain.
  • Fioricet belongs to the class of medicines known as barbiturates because it contains butalbital. It may also be called a combination analgesic.